Taiwanese Potstickers

Part crispy, part soft & tender with a delicious pork filling inside. The textural difference of these potstickers will blow your mind.

Part thin & crispy, part soft & tender with a delicious pork filling inside. The textural difference of the potstickers will blow your mind.

Why hello there.

Potstickers anyone?

Part crispy, part soft & tender with a delicious pork filling inside. The textural difference of these potstickers will blow your mind.

No, not the kind where you just fry em’.

Not the kind where you only add water and then fry em’.

Definitely not the kind where you steam and then fry em’.

Part crispy, part soft & tender with a delicious pork filling inside. The textural difference of these potstickers will blow your mind.

Part crispy, part soft & tender with a delicious pork filling inside. The textural difference of these potstickers will blow your mind.

It’s the kind you will get at most dumplings shops in Taiwan. And Japan. And China. But Taiwan mostly since I first ate it there.

Like Din Tai Fung?

Yup.

Part thin & crispy, part soft & tender with a delicious pork filling inside. The textural difference of the potstickers will blow your mind.

Din Tai whaaat?  Ok, so maybe if I’m lucky, 1 out of 5 of you will know what I’m talking about. Yes, L.A. peeps.

Guys, it’s the real deal. The real kind.

The kind with a light, thin, crispy brown lace at the bottom connecting all the dumplings. When you take a bite of it, you’ll get a half crunch half tender bite from the outside and into the moist, tasty filling inside. The textural difference between the steamed and the fried will just blow your mind.

Part thin & crispy, part soft & tender with a delicious pork filling inside. The textural difference of the potstickers will blow your mind.

It’s a wicked hybrid frying-steaming technique all done in ONE pan. Easy? If I may say so.

But how? Water and starch.

Water steaming will cook the dumplings. When the water has evaporated and the dumplings are cooked, what’s left behind (or more accurately, what’s left at the bottom) is a starch flurry which has perfectly browned and crisp up to a thin layer.

Yeah. Genius. A little bit of magic too seeing how you’re going to watch ’em disappear…. into your tummy.

Part thin & crispy, part soft & tender with a delicious pork filling inside. The textural difference of the potstickers will blow your mind.

Tips:

1. Wrappers: Do not buy wonton wrappers. They are meant for wontons and are therefore thinner. Potstickers need a thicker wrapper. Looks for ones labelled Gyoza. With that said, different brands have different sizes and thickness. If you like thick ones, go for Korean brands or Wei Chuan brand. For thinner ones go for most other Chinese brands.

2. Ratio of meat to cabbage can be changed according to taste. Omit the cabbage (like Mr. V) if you like your dumplings meaty-ful.

3. It’s imperative to seal the dumplings tight and no air bubbles are present. This is to avoid the filling leaking out or the dumpling breaking apart when they are being cooked.

4. When cooking potstickers, to control the thickness of the crispy ‘lace’, increase or decrease the amount of flour accordingly. More flour equals thicker crust. Different types of flour gives a tad difference in the crust and flavor. Rice flour will yield the crispiest and has a nice flavor to it. I tend to combine different flour.

Part crispy, part soft & tender with a delicious pork filling inside. The textural difference of these potstickers will blow your mind.

PS: No, I don’t make the wrappers from scratch. If I have become a great grandmother with 3 other generations with me… and their hands of course, I may consider making them from scratch. Don’t judge. Honestly, if you can’t be bothered to make your own dumplings, get your grandma to do it. That or buy commercial frozen ones. I won’t judge either.

Want to explore more Taiwanese dishes? How about some Taiwanese Beef Stuffed Scallion Pancake? Or perhaps a bowl of Taiwanese Braised Pork Over Rice? Take your pick.

And if you haven’t already, check out my last post  Malaysian Chicken and Potato Kapitan CurrySavory and slightly tangy creamy curry with the softest & juiciest chicken ever and delicious tender potatoes.

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Taiwanese Potstickers
 
Part crispy, part soft & tender with a delicious pork filling inside. The textural difference of these potstickers will blow your mind.
Author:
Recipe type: Appetizer; Snack
Cuisine: Taiwanese
Serves: 50 (depending on size of wrappers)
Ingredients
  • 1 lb ground pork (80:20 or 85:25)
  • ¾ lb white cabbage, finely diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, fined minced
  • ½" ginger, grated
  • 1 tbs soy sauce
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ⅛ tsp sugar
  • Pinch of white or black pepper
  • 2 pack gyoza wrappers (You'll have leftover)
  • ⅔ tbs flour (rice flour, all purpose flour, cornstarch or a combination of any)
  • ½ cup water (room temperature tap or filtered water)
Directions
To make dumplings
  1. In a large bowl, add the pork, cabbage, onion, garlic, ginger, soy sauce, sesame oil, salt, sugar and pepper. Mix to combine well.
  2. Prepare a bowl of water (amount doesn't matter). Place a small dollop of meat filling (less than 1 tablespoon) in the middle of a wrapper. Dip your finger into the bowl of water and paint the edges of the wrapper.
  3. Bring the bottom of the wrapper to the top. Pinch to seal the center. Now you can choose to pinch to seal the rest of the edges or pleat it however you wish. Make sure there are no air bubbles and seal it tight. Place the dumpling on a baking sheet making sure there's space between dumplings. Repeat until you've finished all the filling.
  4. If you want to freeze them, place the baking sheet of dumplings in the freezer (uncovered). Once the dumplings become semi harden, you can transfer them into a ziploc bag and let it freeze completely. (If you do not let it semi harden first before transferring into a bag, it will mush together and separating them will be impossible).
To cook dumplings
  1. In a small bowl, combine the flour and water together.
  2. For freshly made dumplings: Over medium heat (or a tad lower), heat a 10" non stick pan. Add ½ tsp oil. Add 12 dumplings. Make sure there's a small gap between the dumplings. They will start to sizzle. Pour the flour water mixture in and cover the pan. Let it simmer for 8-10 minutes or until most of the water has evaporated. (For frozen dumplings, do not thaw. Combine ⅔-3/4 tablespoons flour and ⅔ cup water instead and cook for 10-12 minutes or until most water has evaporated).
  3. Uncover and let the bottom starchy flurry dry completely and crisp up (a couple minutes more). Swirl a little oil to help with the crisp and to avoid it sticking to the pan. You can move the pan around the heat source to help it brown evenly. Turn the heat to medium low towards the end for even browning (and to avoid burning). A golden brown crisp skin will form.
  4. Place a plate upside down on the pan and flip the pan (and plate). The potstickers will come off beautifully and land on the plate crisp side up. Enjoy with your favorite dipping sauce. I usually mix hoisin or oyster sauce with some water. Sometimes, I enjoy them with some chili sauce like sriracha or thai chili sauce.

 

42 Responses

  1. Shihoko

    Ohhhh Ai Ping, I am one out 5! know what you are talking about even though I don’t know the Din tai? the language:D Crispy lattice coating at the bottom of the pan! yummm

    Reply
    • AiPing
      AiPing

      Din Tai Fung is a well-known restaurant that serves delicious Chinese dumplings. They have branches all over Australia. Where in Australia do you live?

      Reply
      • Shihoko

        Yeiks, I have to go to the restaurant! I live in Brisbane. I have never heard of it.

      • AiPing
        AiPing

        Ahhh, they may not have it in Brisbane. But def in Sydney and Melbourne. You should try it. 🙂

  2. Maggie

    Potsickers are the most comforting food! I love your step by step pictures, they are so beautiful! I’ll need to grab some dumpling wrappers today, because I’m craving for some now!

    Reply
    • AiPing
      AiPing

      It’s funny how if I was in Taiwan and was craving for potstickers, I’d just go out to eat freshly cooked ones. But here in the US, I’ll make them at home. I bet in China, it’s very easy to get freshly cooked ones too! How’s it like in Texas?

      Reply
  3. Bam's Kitchen

    Loving that crispy crunchy lacy bottom. I am going to have to try your method next time I make dumplings. Loving your beautiful photography. Sharing and pinning!

    Reply
    • AiPing
      AiPing

      I like the steamed kind with plenty of ginger. But with potstickers, I like it with regular dipping sauce. I’m weird like that. 🙂

      Reply
  4. Sabrina

    These potstickers look great! I never saw someone put both flour and water in the pan while steaming them. I’ll have to try this method!

    Reply
    • AiPing
      AiPing

      Oh, just to clarify, this is not the ‘regular’ steaming where water is below and food is high above it. So please don’t ever put flour into water when steaming or you’ll come right to my house to kill me with all that gunk stuck on the bottom of your pan or pot. :p But yea, to get a layer of lacey crust on potstickers, flour is added to water.

      Reply
    • AiPing
      AiPing

      Thanks Whitney. You blew my mind with that whole chicken Tandoori too and that box bread thing you did long time ago! We do our share of blowing each other’s mind. When we’re old, we’re going to end up without any mind. :p

      Reply
  5. Sarah and Laura @ Wandercooks

    Ahhhhhh. We always LOVE dropping by your side of the woods. This is making us miss Taiwan so bad AND I really want to go make Gyoza nownow! Like Nagi, can’t wait to try these and see the difference. Amazing photos as usual miss! 😀

    Reply
    • AiPing
      AiPing

      And I wish that I was traveling with you guys and eating all that good food… although you should be back home by right. :p Celebrate Taiwan right in your kitchen. It’s too easy.

      Reply
    • AiPing
      AiPing

      Sometimes I ramble without sense…. so it’s ok if you have no idea what I was talking about. All that matters is that you enjoy the potsickers. :p

      Reply
      • Renee

        I don’t think you were rambling! It made perfect sense, but I had never heard of Din Tai Fung.

  6. Michele

    You have an amazing way of describing each step so that I know EXACTLY what to do! I always wondered why they were called potstickers and these are the first ones that make complete sense! LOVE this!!

    Reply
  7. Shreyashi

    Hi, my dumpling forming skills are so shabby that I cannot even begin to tell you about it. You make it seem so simple. Your pictures are gorgeous. I love the pork filling. This is an aspirational dish for me 🙂

    Reply
    • AiPing
      AiPing

      That’s exactly what my hubs would say just to get out of makin’ them…. :p How it looks does not matter… well, at least in the beginning. As long as it doesn’t explode when you cook em, all you really need to care about is enjoying them. :p

      Reply
  8. Lynn | The Road to Honey

    These potstickers look absolutely scrumptious. I am a big potsticker fan and I am especially loving that crispy lace that is hugging the edges. It must give these beauties that extra little crunch most potstickers are lacking. Heaven!

    Reply
    • AiPing
      Ai Ping

      Yup yup yup Lynn. I can’t tell you how blown away I was when I first laid eyes on crispy-laced- potstickers in Taiwan. Absolutely phenomenal.

      Reply
  9. Cheyanne @ No Spoon Necessary

    Oh.my.Gawd! I need these. Not like oh these look good, I kinda need them in my life. More like, if I don’t make these immediately I might die.. from wanting and neeeeeeding. These potstickers are beyond perfect looking. And those crispy, lacey bottoms??!!! Drool!!!! Pinning and hitting print! ♡ Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
    • AiPing
      Ai Ping

      Lol… I thought the exact same thing before I made these. Will just die if I don’t have them stat. :p

      Reply

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