Malaysian Char Kway Teow (Fried Flat Rice Noodles)

One of the most popular street food in Malaysia, Char Kway Teow is smoky fried noodles with lard, sausages and prawn cooked in just 5 minutes.

One of the most popular street food in Malaysia, Char Kway Teow is smoky fried noodles with lard, sausages and prawn cooked in just 5 minutes.

You guys….

Today is officially my 1st or 2nd year anniversary (depending on how you look at it) since I started Curious Nut. I officially got the domain in November 2013 but then it was really just fun and play. Besides, after a few months of posting, I had a 7-month hiatus.

Then I started blogging again last November, being as serious and as consistent my Gemini self would allow.

Today’s post also marks my 200th post. Woot woot.

Ok, a few things I’d like to talk about here.

Number 1: Let’s look at a my Dry Noodles picture taken two years ago vs today. Just for fun.

ComparisonNumber 2: Being grateful.

You. Without you, there is NO Curious Nut. Without your awesome index finger clicking the LIKE button on Facebook or Share buttons on the blog, Curious Nut is forever lost in the Internet space.

Without your other fingers and brain juice putting together letters into sentences in the comments or personal texts or messages, Curious Nut would be me talking to myself really. So thank you. I appreciate you.

One of the most popular street food in Malaysia, Char Kway Teow is smoky fried noodles with lard, sausages and prawn cooked in just 5 minutes.

Mr. V (my hubs). Instead of me having to convince him, he’s the one who has to convince me to get a new computer or camera or props or table tops… just whatever the heck I need to make Curious Nut great.

His ears arethere  died when I scream in delight when good things happen. He’s also the rock when things seemed bleak. Thank you my baby.

I’ve learned so much just from doing Curious Nut – Cooking, photography, writing… and there’s still so much to learn. I’m thankful that I have the opportunity and be in the position to do so.

One of the most popular street food in Malaysia, Char Kway Teow is smoky fried noodles with lard, sausages and prawn cooked in just 5 minutes.Number 3: Char Kway whaaaaaaaat?

I’ve always been lucky to be able to grow up with 3 of my 4 grandparents. My mom’s dad passed away when I was 2 and I have always wondered what he was like. I often asked my mom or uncles or aunts for stories about my grandfather.

One thing that always seems to be a consensus is that he makes a mean Char Kway Teow. He had a cart where he’d push it to his spot and he’d start to fry and sell Char Kway Teow. People would line up just to get a taste of it.

One of the most popular street food in Malaysia, Char Kway Teow is smoky fried noodles with lard, sausages and prawn cooked in just 5 minutes.

Pronounced char coo-eh tea-yao, Char Kway Teow is one of the most popular street food in Malaysia. It’s made from a flat type of rice noodles that when cooked right, has the perfect softness and bounce to each bite. The use of lard and the fact that it’s cooked in high heat makes this fried noodles simply irresistibly addictive. Smoky, delicious noodles in just 5 minutes.

So seeing it’s the blog’s anniversary and my 200th post, I’d like to just dedicate today’s post to my grandfather. It’s unfortunate that I don’t have a recipe from him. However, my dad has been frying char kway teow since I can even remember. And to me, it’s the best one of all. Below is the exact recipe and method that he has taught me.

Enjoy guys.

One of the most popular street food in Malaysia, Char Kway Teow is smoky fried noodles with lard, sausages and prawn cooked in just 5 minutes.

Tips:

1. Once the first ingredient hits the wot, it takes approximately 5 minutes for the dish to complete. We’re cooking at high heat here so make sure all the ingredients are ready and in arms reach.

2. Thick caramel sauce is for color. Put as much or as little depending on how light or dark you like your noodles to be.

3. Traditionally, char kway teow has cockles. If you can find them (and love them), make sure to add them. Cook (boil) and remove them from the shells first. Add them along with the chives.

4. You can increase the recipe to serve 4 or more but cook each batch in servings of two for best smoky and slightly charred result.

5. Fresh rice noodles (1/2″ wide), Chinese sausages and Chinese chives can be found in most Asian markets.

 

Love fried noodles? You’re going to love this Malaysian Lo Shu Fun. Another one of Malaysian’s favorite street noodles. This time using a different type of noodles. On the table in less than 15 minutes. Easy, smoky & delicious.

Malaysian Lo Shu Fun (Fried Rice Noodles)

If you haven’t already, check out my last post Dark Chocolate Digestives Biscuit S’mores. Ooey gooey marshmallow and rich dark chocolate sandwiched between two crisp, light and tender digestive biscuits.

Dark-Chocolate-Digestive-Biscuits-S'mores

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Malaysian Char Kway Teow (Fried Flat Rice Noodles)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
One of the most popular street food in Malaysia, Char Kway Teow is smoky fried noodles with lard, sausages and prawn cooked in just 5 minutes.
Author:
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Malaysian
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 2 tbs lard
  • 6 large garlic cloves, finely diced
  • 2 Chinese sausages, sliced
  • 10-12 large prawns, peeled and deveined
  • 2 cups bean sprouts
  • 16 oz fresh rice noodles (flat type), separated and loosened
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup Chinese chives, cut into 2" length
  • Salt and white pepper, to taste

  • Sauce
  • 2 tbs light soy sauce
  • ½-1 tbs thick caramel sauce (depending on how light or dark you like)
  • ½ - 1 tbs sambal (optional, for spicy version)
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • ½ tsp chicken stock granules (optional)
Directions
  1. In a small bowl, combine the ingredients for the sauce and mix well.
  2. Heat a wok over medium fire. Add the lard. Once the wok is almost smoking, fry the garlic. When the garlic turn a light brown, add the sausages and prawns. Turn the heat to high and fry.
  3. Once the prawns are almost pink, add the bean sprouts and noodles. Add the sauce, a pinch of salt and white pepper to taste. Fry for 1 minute. The noodles will have soften a little.
  4. Make a hole or push the noodles aside. Crack the eggs and stir to break the yolk. Add a pinch of salt onto the eggs. Cover the eggs with the noodles. Add the chives. Once the egg has almost set (takes about 10-15 seconds), stir to combine. Take a quick taste. Add more salt or soy sauce if necessary. Serve immediately.

 

24 Responses

  1. Emily

    I want to try this recipe but I’m a pescetarian…what can I use to substitute lard?

    • AiPing
      AiPing

      There really isn’t a perfect substitute for lard. The only thing I can think of is shallot or garlic infused oil. Hope this helps.

  2. Tara

    Your photos are lovely. I don’t think I’m brave enough to try the recipe, but I’m going to bookmarkit anyway. Congratulations on your 200th post!

  3. elaine|ChinaSichuanFood

    Haha, this really looks so great. We have pan-fried rice noodles a lot in our daily cooking. And I love the idea of using lard. Lard is always great with noodles.

    • AiPing
      AiPing

      I can’t get enough of fried noodles. My dad will make them often when I was young and we’d eat it in restaurants and as street food in Malaysia too. My dad uses lard a lot so that’s where I learned it from. Haha. So good!!

  4. Maggie

    OMG this noodle dish looks so scrumptious! I want to devour a big plate now! I love Malaysian food but has been intimidated by the cooking. It is great to learn about these sauce. So many things to explore!

    • AiPing
      AiPing

      It’s one of my fav street food noodles in Msia. So good. It’s hard to find good Malaysian food in the US though. Malaysian food isn’t intimating once you get the hang of it. With your skills, you’ll take no time. :p I feel the same way about food from China. Even more to explore.

  5. Dini @ The Flavor Bender

    This looks so delicious!! I am a sucker for Asian flavours and I’m drooling just staring at this!
    Congratulations on your 2nd year Celebrations AND the 200th post!! I discovered your blog through FBC, and I am absolutely loving it! 🙂

  6. Nagi@RecipeTinEats

    Congratulations on your 2nd birthday!! 🙂 And what a dish to celebrate with! This is one of my all time favourite noodle stir fries. I have been searching for a really good recipe for ages – and I think this is IT!!! I adore your food. We have very similar tastes! 🙂

    • AiPing
      AiPing

      Thanks Nagi. I bet they have so much Malaysian food down under. 🙂 We definitely have similar taste for I love EVERYTHING you make. Bold flavors indeed. Hope you’re having a great vacation so far and see you soon. If you need anything in LA, just let me know. 🙂

  7. Claudia | The Brick Kitchen

    Happy blog birthday!! So impressed that you have done 200 posts, and your photos are absolutely beautiful. Your writing is always so relatable and easy to read as well, I love it! This char kway teow is going right to the top of my list to make as well – looks phenomenal. x

  8. Helen @ Scrummy Lane

    Hello AiPing!
    Your post caught my eye on FBC. I’m always drawn in my Asian noodle recipes, but most of all I LOVED your photos!
    Congratulations on your first (2nd?) blog anniversary, and all the best for the next year of blogging!

    • AiPing
      AiPing

      Hey Helen. Thank you very much. I’m glad you love Asian noodles too. Yeah… 1st… 2nd.. anniversary, who knows? :p

  9. Christine | Vermilion Roots

    Congratulations! I’m so glad to have met you through Curious Nut. I remember being really, really excited when I first saw those great photos of Malaysian food on your blog, and realising they come with recipes too. This char kway teow post is super awesome and just perfect for this anniversary milestone. 🙂